Origin of year dating

The first two parts—the month and date—have had a legion of originators, from Cro-Magnon astronomers marking phases of the moon on their eagle bones, to Mayan mystics tracking the movements of the stars from their forest canopies. Tests date the Earth to about 4.54 billion years old, but a whole lot of that time didn't really have anything of substance—to us humans, at least.

The 365-and-change-day calendar we use is the result of scientific sweat, an attempt to bring us to a Verifiable Truth regarding how long it takes the Earth to complete one rotation around the sun. Starting a calendar 4.54 billion years ago doesn't make much intuitive sense.

Carlos Noreña, a scholar of ancient history at University of California-Berkeley. “The Romans didn't impose their dating system,” Noreña says. The most recent dating battle has been a semantic one over the rise of C. “This is a little bit silly for two reasons,” Noreña says.

“In the Middle Ages and Antiquity, there were multiple eras jostling for recognition.”The key wasn't what Year One was, as much as getting everyone on the same page. “But because they were so powerful and influential, people picked up their calendar and dating system because it was convenient.”While these were the dominant systems, there was a hodge-podge of various cultures with different Year Ones. “One, they use the same year, so it's the same system.

If you were dating something, anywhere from today or years ago, you would either put an A.

but when did this begin and why do we date years by this method?

At its core, that date—any date really—is just a code.

But in our modern world of scientific reason and religious plurality, the battle over whether or not to use the increasingly accepted international scientific standard of BCE (“Before Common Era”) and CE (“Common Era”) has not waned, but rather has intensified.

There are many religious calendars in existence, but each is normally in use in one region of the world -- typically by followers of a single religion.

Almost all of the world's religious calendars are based on religion, astrology, or myth: The division between BC/BCE and AD/CE is not based on religious considerations.

It is a centuries-old argument that some maintain is integral to one’s identity as a Christian.

And I have spent far too much time on Wikipedia changing BCs and ADs back to BCEs and CEs.

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